Rosemary Essential Oil

Species: Rosamarinus officinalis
Plant Family: 

Lamiaceae (Labiatae).

Origins: 

Comes mainly from Tunisia and other Mediterranean countries like Spain, France and Italy but is grown the world over.

Extraction: 

The oil is obtained from the leaves and flowers of the herb.

Rosemary is an evergreen herb which can grow up to 6 foot in height. Oil from Tunisia is generally accepted to be of the best quality. In that country the herb is harvested in April and May and is normally harvested by hand and the oil produced on site.

Properties: 

Analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, astringent, cephalic, diuretic, hypotensive, rubefacient, stimulant, nervine, vulnerary, cordial, tonic, uplifting.

Usage & methods of application: 

Rosemary is an essential oil which can contain different properties and constituents depending on where in the world the plant used to produce it has been grown. These are known as "chemotypes" and Rosemary comes in three types. Borneol is a particularly stimulating version and is best for relaxing muscles and in massage treatments aimed at easing problems with the liver or kidneys. Cineol is best for inhalations and is clearing and soothing for problems with the sinuses. Heightened rejuvenating abilities can be found in the verbonene type which is considered best for skincare blends. Confusingly all three are still known as Rosmarinus officinalis but we recommend that you ensure you are aware of which strain you are purchasing. 

When burned or vaporised Rosemary acts to protect against and lessen the symptoms of flu, colds, chest infections and sinusitis. It also works on the mental side to clear the mind, refreshing and activating the brain to help bring mental clarity. It may also help those suffering from fatigue, lethargy and works to improve the memory. 

In massage Rosemary is recognised as a stimulating oil and is commonly found in preparations for exercise related injuries and pains. It may also assist the treatment of arthritis, rheumatism and bursitis. It's a rubefacient and so stimulates poor circulation and can help to improve low blood pressure. 

Rosemary can also be used in hair treatments. It's thought to be effective against dandruff and some even claim that it can assist in renewing hair growth and prevent premature balding. It's a great oil to use in the morning shower as it stimulates the brain and gets you going for the day.  

Rosemary is a lovely to oil to burn or vaporise. You get the physical and mental benefit of the vapour from the oil as well as a gorgeous aroma. 

It should be diluted in a carrier oil before use in massage. For the best results, dilute to 5% or less and massage the affected area in a circular motion. 

Like many essential oils, Rosemary can be added to other cosmetic and toiletry products to make use of its wonderful properties. For example, to take advantage of it's positive effect on the hair and scalp, simply add a drop or two to your existing shampoo and shake the bottle thoroughly before each use. 

Organic version also available.

Blends well with: 

You may find that Rosemary blends particularly well with Cedarwood, Citronella, Geranium, Lavender, Lemongrass and Peppermint.